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Recipe #1: Striped Pease Pudding

Sorry, I haven't gotten to FB yet; I'm still recovering from the busiest two weeks I've had in a long time.  I went to bed at 7pm yesterday.

I actually promised a few people I would post my recipes for the Governor's table at Foods and Feasts (Jamestown), so here's one, with a little history.  I'll do more over the week.  I don't have pics yet, because I was a numpty and forgot my camera, but other people took pictures, and I'll post them whenever they arrive.

First, one of my traditional recipes, that isn't exactly from a book, but is an accumulation of family knowledge mixed with some historic research:

Striped Pease Pudding
Ingredients:
1/2 lb yellow dried split peas
1/2 lb green dried split peas
2 tsp butter
2 eggs
2 chicken or vegetable bouillon cubes
salt and pepper to taste
water
Crisco or lard to grease the pudding bowl

Utensils
2 2-qt saucepans
2 medium bowls
sieve
1 ceramic small/medium pudding bowl (any ceramic bowl will do; the shape of the pudding is determined by the inside shape of the bowl).
aluminum foil
Large (6-qt) saucepan

Put the yellow peas in one pan, and the green peas in the other.  Add 4 cups of water and one bouillon cube to each pan.  Cook the peas until they are soft, which can take a while, so be patient.  Keep adding more water as needed to cover the peas and allow them to cook evenly.  Once they really start becoming mushy, lower the heat to a bare simmer, and cook, stirring often, until all the extra water is gone.

Sieve the peas separately into the medium bowls, making sure all the lumps are out.  Allow to cool until barely warm. Add 1 egg, 1tsp butter, and salt & pepper to each bowl and whisk until the egg and butter are completely blended with the peas.

Grease the 1-qt bowl heavily (be generous; the pudding will be hard to unmold otherwise).  Carefully layer the green and yellow peas 1-2" deep into the pudding bowl, making sure not to put in too much of the peas at once, so that the layers don't mix.  Fill a third of the large saucepan with water.  Cover the pudding bowl tightly with aluminum foil and place in the large saucepan, making sure the water is neither too high (it will get into the pudding and ruin it) nor too low (the pudding will burn).  Bring the water to a boil, then lower to a simmer, cooking the pudding for 2 hours, adding water to the large saucepan if needed (be careful not to let it boil dry).

Allow the pudding to cool for about 20 minutes, then turn out onto a flat plate.  Serve warm or cold (unmold the pudding while warm; store in the fridge), in slices.

Here's a picture of it from last year (I made more stripes this year, but it didn't set quite as well):
January 2014 034
(It's on the right side of the picture, next to the candle.  The yellow and green thing.) (Not me, I'm pink and green.)

This pudding is one of the oldest traditional British puddings*; the earliest mention I found in my own books was in a cookery book from 1420**.  It used to be made by putting whole dried peas into a muslin bag, tying the top closed, and putting it into the pot where the meat was boiled for soup or stew.  The peas would swell up and take on the flavour of the pork and seasonings.  While not a fancy dish in that form, when the peas are cooked in layers so that the resultant dish is striped when cut into slices, it is far more elegant, and provides a welcome addition to pork and ham dishes.


*The word "pudding" refers to the manner of cooking, not the flavour, in much the same way as "roast".

** Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books, Thomas Austin(ed.), printed for the Early English Text Society, Oxford University Press, 1888 (facsimile, Boydell & Brewer Ltd., New York, 2000).

Comments

( 2 brains — Leave a chunk of brain! )
eithni
Dec. 6th, 2014 05:50 am (UTC)
Oh. My.

I read that title too quickly and at first glance, I had to wonder how you were making a Strip Tease Pudding! O.o
wosny
Dec. 11th, 2014 10:53 am (UTC)
Ok, as soon as I saw this I wanted to make it...and today I have decided to do it. Unfortunately for some reason yellow split peas just don't seem to appear on French shelves. I am substituting coral lentils, which I hope will work. I am planning to show it on my lj and linking back to you, if that is ok...?
( 2 brains — Leave a chunk of brain! )

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